04 February 2017

SEESAW INSIGHTS: Making Memes in Spanish

If there's one thing that catches my students' attention as surely as music, it is memes. Sure you can have students read memes for some authentic input. But how exciting is it to see what kind of jokes and jabs they can come up with?

And it doesn't matter if meme generators or Instagram are blocked on your school wifi. I just posted this template to Seesaw, instructed the young ones to

1. copy & edit my image and
2. add labels to their copy in Spanish
All they had to do beyond that was make sure the result was directly relevant to class topics.


If they were having trouble coming up with an idea, I had them refer to the classmate blogs they commented on the day before to see if they found any errors they could use.

This is my favorite meme to come out of my first attempt at a meme making activity in Spanish II:


I mean, I like Axel as much as the next Spanish teacher, and I did have to have her resubmit this one with toca instead of jugar, but I bet she remembers those words now. And by golly, she's got her some opinions on pop latino!

Not all of the memes were as opinionated. Some were, in fact mechanical--maybe posts I could go back and tag with the chronic offenders' names on Seesaw. Some were cute, and some were blunt. But all gave me insight into what the kiddos understood and what they could do.

And so we have the spelling memes:


We have the grammar memes:



We have the memes making fun of Sra.'s quirks


One of my favorite sayings in "¿Cómo que 'thank you'?" and you can't get out the door without looking me and saying adiós.

We have the memes expressing their distaste for certain types of assignments from blogs to portfolios to assessments:


I didn't realize how unpopular the simplified vocab blogs were, but I probably could have guessed everyone felt more comfortable reading than listening or speaking. But this is valuable insight, you know? They get a chance to quickly express what they're thinking in a fun way and share with the class as I go through approving the memes to the feed!

 We also have the suck-up memes:



And the tell-me-how-you-really-feel memes:



The them's-fightin'-words memes:


And of course the we-have-a-new-crush-after-chatting-with-a-Canadian-Spanish-class memes:



I suspect that other memes might not end up this adaptable, but I bet we could get some brutal honesty and maybe some suffix awareness out of this one:

Plural endings are coming?
vienen las infografiías?

Maybe some more class procedures commentary and/or adjective agreement awareness out of this one:
Dices que quieres a tu mamá, pero le pones "bonitO"
...pero eso no es asunto mío.


And I bet we could get all kinds of opinions and reflection and advice out of these:


The point is that Seesaw makes it super easy to upload, adapt, and share memes, and memes make it super easy for students to express themselves with as much language as they feel comfortable with.

So which templates will you be uploading to Seesaw?

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