13 September 2015

Actividades - México y Aquí: Novice IPA

This time I am certain I've got a novice-appropriate Integrated Performance Assessment. And I've worked in a little cultural comparison.

I might be getting the hang of this!

I opted to find an authentic text--an infograph--about free-time activities to tie in with their Genius Hour interests and with our work with me, te, and le gusta at least. And this time we've spent enough time applying that vocabulary that I won't need to mess with additional prompting and HINTING in the assignments themselves so much.

Interpretive Reading

I found an awesome infograph from AztecaNoticias and jazzed up my template a little:



Basically I made sure I have a spot for them to put the original Spanish (which since it's a graphic, they'll actually have to type out instead of copy and paste. Alas.) AND their English interpretation. They can copy as much or as little as they need, but I'll emphasize for my heritage speakers who lobbied for Spanish II credit to zero in on the few sentences there are and include as much detail and analysis as possible.

Interpersonal

This interpersonal task is perfectly in line with Novice Mid ACTFL can-dos like "I can communicate some basic information about my everyday life," to say nothing of those about making statements or asking and answering questions. 
Find a partner and RECORD A 1-3 MINUTE DISCUSSION IN SPANISH comparing and contrasting the activities you and your partner like with the activities that are popular with young people in Mexico. Upload the video here.
IT IS IMPORTANT THAT BOTH PARTNERS ATTEMPT TO *ASK* QUESTIONS TO GET BEYOND NOVICE LOW.

Presentational Writing

I considered glossing over the audience for this one, but decided there might be more potential for demonstrating depth and variety in their language, especially for those heritage speakers.
Write a list (Novice Low/Mid) or a paragraph (Novice Mid/High) in Spanish for parents who want to know about good activities for teens (jóvenes). Compare your interests to the interests of a typical Mexican teen. What are good ideas and bad ideas for activities for teens?

7 comments:

  1. Hi. I am actually a German teacher but I love this idea! I wanted to make sure I understood though. The students first examine the inforgraph. Then they ask questions to a partner about the infograph. Once they have asked these questions they will need to record their conversation. They then need to use the other paper and write down the spanish from the infograph and add the english that correspondes?

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    Replies
    1. Close! First they show that they understand the infograph using the Google Doc I provided.

      Then they record a conversation with their partner where they discuss how their own interests compare to those in the infograph. The questions are SUPPOSED to be built into the conversation, but it's been tricky getting them to do that, and I've actually started just working with them one by one.

      Finally, they write out some advice for parents on activities that their teens should or should not do, using the facts about the Mexican teens as a reference.

      Does that make sense?

      Delete
    2. Close! First they show that they understand the infograph using the Google Doc I provided.

      Then they record a conversation with their partner where they discuss how their own interests compare to those in the infograph. The questions are SUPPOSED to be built into the conversation, but it's been tricky getting them to do that, and I've actually started just working with them one by one.

      Finally, they write out some advice for parents on activities that their teens should or should not do, using the facts about the Mexican teens as a reference.

      Does that make sense?

      Delete
  2. Help! I have been working on implementing IPA's for the upcoming school year but I have some questions and I'm a little clueless as to who to go to with this. Here it is: How do you execute the Presentational tasks? If it's supposed to be practiced, polished, edited, and allow students the freedom to use references, do students turn in a rough draft to be edited (possibly as a formative assessment earlier on?), do you allow them to use dictionaries to look up words they might need for their presentation, or do you treat it as a test and only give them a certain amount of class time to formulate and present - in which case when do they add a technology component (video to create a commercial, etc) since they can't accomplish all that in one class period? My concern is the use of translators or outside influences (heritage speaker friends). So, what do you do in your classes with the presentational component?

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    Replies
    1. OK, so my take on the Presentational in the IPA setting has more of an emphasis on the spontaneous than the polished. They produce what they can then and there *without* references, taking as much time as they need in class.

      HOWEVER, I then highlight problems and have students revise them before adding them to their PORTFOLIOS.

      My understanding is that the AAPPL assessment is also more focused on the spontaneous production, so that's how I justify that AND the emphasis on only Presentational Writing and not Speaking (which, really is mostly Interpersonal for novices anyway).

      This also frees me up to do revisions and finished products without the high stakes "test" designation so those experiences can be more enjoyable.

      Delete
    2. So do you assess the unrevised first draft and that goes in the grade book, or do you give them feedback and assess the final draft? And thank you for helping me work through this in my head!

      Delete
    3. I assess the unrevised first draft as a test grade, give them feedback, and give them credit for the final draft without scoring it. They can, however, use it to demonstrate ACTFL Can-Dos in their portfolios after revision.

      Delete